Category Archives: North Carolina

kSep Systems acquired by Sartorius Stedim

Sartorius Stedim Biotech acquires U.S. start-up kSep Systems

Transaction to expand SSB’s bioprocessing product portfolio with innovative single-use centrifuges

AUBAGNE, France– 7.6.16 –(BUSINESS WIRE)–Regulatory News:

kSep LogoSartorius Stedim Biotech (SSB), a leading international supplier for the biopharmaceutical industry, today has signed a contract to acquire U.S. centrifuge specialist kSep Holdings, Inc. (kSep). The privately owned company based in Morrisville, North Carolina, has been operating on the market since 2011, and is expected to achieve significant double-digit growth and to generate around $7 million sales revenues and a strong double-digit EBITDA margin in 2016. The transaction values kSep at around $28 million and will be closed by the end of July 2016.

kSep has developed and markets single-use, fully automated centrifugation systems used for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals, such as vaccines, cell-based therapeutics and monoclonal antibodies. Reinhard Vogt, member of SSB’s Board, commented, “kSep’s centrifuges are a very innovative, single-use cell separation technology that perfectly complements our offering for downstream bioprocessing. Our clients will greatly benefit from the unique ability to collect, wash and concentrate cells quickly and reduce both the time and cost of downstream purification steps.” SSB will retain kSep’s current leadership and staff.

“Sartorius Stedim Biotech’s strong relationships with its customers will significantly speed up our internationalization and business growth. SSB will provide access to considerably more customers, especially in Asia, a market we haven’t developed yet,” said Sunil Mehta, President and CEO of kSep.

This press release contains statements about the future development of the Sartorius Stedim Biotech Group. We cannot guarantee that the content of these statements will actually apply because these statements are based upon assumptions and estimates that harbor certain risks and uncertainties.

A profile of Sartorius Stedim Biotech

Sartorius Stedim Biotech is a leading international supplier of products and services that enable the biopharmaceutical industry to develop and manufacture drugs safely and efficiently. As a total solutions provider, Sartorius Stedim Biotech offers a portfolio covering nearly all steps of biopharmaceutical manufacture. The company focuses on single-use technologies and value-added services to meet the rapidly changing technology requirements of the industry it serves. Headquartered in Aubagne, France, Sartorius Stedim Biotech is quoted on the Eurolist of Euronext Paris. With its own manufacturing and R&D sites in Europe, North America and Asia and a global network of sales companies, Sartorius Stedim Biotech has a global reach. The company employs approx. 4,200 people, and in 2015 earned sales revenue of 884.3 million euros.

A profile of kSep

kSep Systems leverages its innovation, engineering, and cGMP manufacturing expertise to provide robust and automated single-use centrifugation solutions for the manufacturing of recombinant therapeutics, cell therapy products, and vaccines. kSep products solve the problems of traditional centrifugation-based systems by providing a gentle processing environment for the concentration, washing, and separation of cells while maintaining high recoveries. kSep Systems, a spinoff from KBI Biopharma, Inc., was established in 2011 and is based in Morrisville, NC.

The love of taxes is the root of unhappiness, Part II

New evidence from the dismal science confirms what social science has already shown: the love of taxes is the root of unhappiness.

The original social science, from the December 2009 issue of Science, indicated that states with the highest taxes also have the least happy residents.  Residents of high tax states not only have less money to spend on other things that make them happy, they don’t enjoy many benefits in exchange for all their hard-earned tax dollars.  Roads, schools, and crime are no better (and in many cases worse) while their state governments borrow even more and spend disproportionately on public employee pensions and entitlement programs.  Their needs ignored at the expense of entrenched special interests, taxpayers get unhappy.  And then they get out.

From this one might argue causation; high taxes = unhappiness.  While we are certainly sympathetic to that point of view, we also have to wonder if it runs vice-versa, or at least cuts both ways: unhappy people like to raise taxes.

We are… happy.  And happy to report that’s true for our region as well.  NVSE readers already know that the Southeast’s advantages extend well beyond the matter of taxes and include lower public sector debt burdens, stronger job creation, the best climate for entrepreneurs, and a superior overall business climate.  (The actual climate happens to be conducive to a great quality of life as well.)

The more recent dismal science is courtesy of The Red-State Path to Prosperity, from Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore in last week’s Wall Street Journal:

Consider the South. We predict that within a decade five or six states in Dixie could entirely eliminate their income taxes. This would mean that the region stretching from Florida through Texas and Louisiana could become a vast state income-tax free zone.  Three of these states—Florida, Texas and Tennessee—already impose no income tax. Louisiana and North Carolina… are moving quickly ahead with plans to eliminate theirs. Just to the west, Kansas and Oklahoma are also devising plans to replace their income taxes with more growth-friendly expanded sales taxes and energy extraction taxes…

All the empirical evidence shows that raising a state’s tax burden weakens its tax base. Still, too many blue-state lawmakers believe that a primary purpose of government is to redistribute income from rich to poor, even if those policies make everyone, including the poor, less well off. The obsession with “fairness” puts growth secondary.  Meanwhile, in the South, watch for a zero-income-tax domino effect.

Here Mr. Laffer further discusses how blue states are struggling to compete for businesses and workers with the Journal‘s Mary Kissel:

Southeast dominates CEOs Top 10

For the eighth consecutive year, Texas has been voted the best state for business by Chief Executive magazine. 

The Top 10 looks familiar to us, as it constitutes most of the geography in which we have focused our investment efforts for over twenty years now, and adds to the growing list of evidence that some states understand job creation better than others.  The 2012 edition of their annual survey of CEOs includes a feature on What Keeps Texas on Top:

The state is growing its own companies but also is displaying remarkable success in luring investments from other states, particularly California, which once again ranks last in our survey. A raft of small, technology companies have either relocated to Texas or moved key operations there.  Bigger California companies, such as Facebook, eBay and PetCo also have recently opened operations in Texas, and major manufacturers from different states, such as General Electric’s transportation unit and Caterpillar have located big new plants in Fort Worth and Victoria, respectively.  “Employers from around the nation and all over the world continue to look to Texas as the premier location for business expansion, relocation and job growth thanks to our low taxes, reasonable and predictable regulations, fair legal system and skilled workforce,” Gov. Rick Perry told Chief Executive.

Texas has powerful momentum and it’s difficult to see what could halt it…  The sheer diversification in its economy—all the way from wheat farming to semiconductors—suggests that the state could absorb many punches and keep on rolling.

The love of taxes is the root of unhappiness: update

The Tax Foundation has issued its 2012 State Business Tax Climate Index, which once again confirms that the love of taxes is the root of unhappiness.

We remain… happy.  And happy to report that’s true for our region as well.

When confronted with the argument that higher taxes = unhappiness, we wonder, even while remaining sympathetic to the point of view, whether or not it runs vice-versa, or at least cuts both ways:  unhappy people like to raise taxes.

This is just the most recent study – see also herehere, here, here, here, here, and here – to confirm the country is experiencing the rise of the high-tech South.

Another factor in the Southeast’s attractive growth potential – and one clearly related to taxes – is lower state debt burdens.  Some state governments, when faced with crushing budget deficits, respond with growth-stalling tax increases on the businesses that operate in their states.  (The problem worsens dramatically when one considers many states’ unfunded pension liabilities.)

Two states whose budget woes have garnered recent headlines include Illinois, which pushed through a 45% increase in corporate taxes – apparently triggering an exodus; and California, which is on the verge of running out of money – again.

Some states, like the aforementioned California, respond in other “desperate ways” which further undermine investor confidence and entrepreneurial spirits:  accounting gimmicks, delayed payments, issuing IOUs, or even more borrowing.  As we’ve written before, only one non-Southeastern state – Nebraska – has a lower debt-to-GDP ratio than FL (5th), GA (4th), TN (2nd), NC (3rd), TX and VA (tied for 6th).

State debt-to-GDP ratio (Source: AEI)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southeastern cities dominate Forbes Top 10 list

Our region took 9 out of the 10 top spots in Forbes’ list of The Next Big Boom Towns in the U.S.  The rankings were done in conjunction with Mark Schill at the Praxis Strategy Group, and are based on job growth, attractive lifestyle, ease of starting a business, and a broad range of demographic factors.

We do love Phoenix, but these are several of the cities we and our entrepreneurs call home.

  1. Austin, TX
  2. Raleigh, NC
  3. Nashville, TN
  4. San Antonio, TX
  5. Houston, TX
  6. Washington, DC-VA-MD-WV
  7. Dallas-Fort Worth, TX
  8. Charlotte, NC-SC
  9. Phoenix, AZ
  10. Orlando, FL

Southeast dominates CEOs Top 10

For the seventh straight year, Texas has been voted the best state for business by Chief Exectuive magazine.

2011’s edition of their annual survey of CEOs includes an excellent interactive map.

The Top 10 looks familiar to us, as it constitutes most of the geography in which we have focused our investment efforts for over twenty years now, and adds to the growing list of evidence that some states understand job creation better than others.

 

 

Southeast advantage in 25 high growth industries

Wells Fargo has released a study entitled “Employment Dynamics and State Competitiveness” which predicts 25 industries will drive employment growth in the next few years, and ranks states according to their likely ability to capitalize on those trends.  As with previous related studies – see here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here – our region performs very well.

The team of economists in their Securities Economics Group credit (among other things) the availability of skilled workers in our region – both homegrown and those drawn to the quality of life.

States with a large number of high-growth industries that also have a large skilled workforce will be at a greater competitive advantage. This would tend to favor states, such as Georgia, North Carolina, Arizona, Virginia and Texas, which not only have a large supply of skilled workers but have also been successful at attracting such workers from other parts of the nation. Florida, which has more high-growth industries than any other state, would be in a stronger position if not for the weakened housing market, which has cut into worker mobility. The Sunshine State is making important enhancements to its university system to bring in more cutting-edge research, and this should pay off with an even better mix of high-growth industries in future years.

Ranking the Southeast business climate

The Chicago Tribune urges Illinois not to become a “New Michigan” or “New California” but instead mimic states such as FL, GA, VA, TN, TX, and NC.  In an April 11 op-ed entitled The Illinois Spiral they reference the third edition of Rich States, Poor States (from the American Legislative Exchange Council) in which our region scores very well:

ALEC ranked states’ economic outlook vs. their 10 year (1998-2008) economic performance based on 15 policy variables which influence the overall business climate.  The results look vaguely familiar to us, and are another vote of confidence in the Southeast as a preferred region in which to work, live, and invest:

5. Florida
8. Virginia
9. Georgia
10. Tennessee
19. Texas
21. North Carolina
32. Massachusetts
46. California
50. New York

As the Tribune puts it:

Employers tend to be harder-headed in deciding where to invest their money than our lawmakers are in spending other people’s money. The employers see Illinois pols dithering through a crisis, inviting an even more bleak future with their refusal to reform government spending and reduce what it costs to have a payroll in Illinois:

• Nor have you heard Illinois leaders, in their to and fro over an income tax hike, confront a 2009 report by the American Legislative Exchange Council: A decade’s worth of hard data suggests that states with no individual income tax created 89 percent more jobs, and had 32 percent faster personal income growth, than did states with the highest income tax rates. The report also analyzed 15 policy factors that influence a state’s growth prospects — tax burdens, debt service, tort climate, mandated minimum wage, spending limits if any — and ranked Illinois’ economic outlook as an alarming 44th in the U.S.

• Nor have you heard Illinois leaders confront this state’s devastating rank in job creation, 48th, and ask how they can be friendlier to present and potential employers. Illinois — with its overspending, its borrowing and its worst-in-America pension crisis — faces massive obligations that give potential employers pause. Add to this toxic mix Illinois’ high cost of workers compensation and its 49th-in-the-U.S. bond ratings. How surprised, then, are we that since 1990 Illinois has underperformed the U.S. in job growth?

SE states’ debt burdens more favorable

The New York Times confirms another reason for the Southeast’s attractive growth potential and why increasing numbers of entrepreneurs are deciding to build their businesses in the region:  lower state debt burdens.  As the attached graph shows, the problem worsens dramatically when one considers many states’ unfunded pension liabilities.  (Click thumbnail for “top” 25 states for debt-to-GDP, “Overloaded with Debts Unseen”.)

Not only will such debt levels likely lead to growth-stalling tax increases on the businesses that operate in those states, but some of the states are also responding in “desperate ways” which could undermine investor confidence and result in a credit squeeze similar to that currently experienced by Greece (and perhaps someday by other PIGS.)

State Debt Woes Grow Too Big to Camouflage

By MARY WILLIAMS WALSH

California, New York and other states are showing many of the same signs of debt overload that recently took Greece to the brink — budgets that will not balance, accounting that masks debt, the use of derivatives to plug holes, and armies of retired public workers who are counting on benefits that are proving harder and harder to pay.

Complete NYTimes article here

Original American Enterprise Institute white paper here

UPDATE (3/31/10, 3:08PM):

Having had a chance to digest the original white paper, we are even more pleased than before to report that only one state – NE – has a lower debt-to-GDP % than FL (5th), GA (4th), TN (2nd), NC (3rd), TX and VA (tied for 6th).

The love of taxes is the root of unhappiness

A recent study in Science magazine indicates that states with the highest taxes also have the least happy residents.  The Wall Street Journal, reporting on the study, argues that the causation is high taxes = unhappiness.  While we are certainly sympathetic to that point of view, we also have to wonder if it runs vice-versa, or at least cuts both ways:  unhappy people like to raise taxes.

We are… happy.  And happy to report that’s true for our region as well.  Here is a *totally random* sample of states’ rankings on the happiness of their residents.  See below the jump for the entire story.

3. Florida
4. Tennessee
12. North Carolina
16. Texas
19. Georgia
28. Virginia
43. Massachusetts
46. California
51. New York

(more…)

© 2017 Ballast Point Ventures. All rights reserved.