Appreciating the rich for how they got there

November 3, 2010

One of the great satisfactions found in our line of work is the close long term relationships we forge with many entrepreneurs, angel investors, and limited partners who have enjoyed their own hard-earned business success.  Their prior success creates in them both the tendency and the wherewithal to help support the next generation of high-growth companies that improve all our lives.  This recent article in Forbes magazine discusses the critical role these successful business people (and their savings) play in fostering economic growth:

Saving is not the practice of the wealthy stashing money under plump mattresses. Rather, [those] savings are the funds [that allow] businesses access to the capital they need to grow. Firms use these funds to start or expand businesses and to buy machinery and other physical capital…

Because much of the savings that can drive investment and economic growth over time comes from the relatively small fraction of individuals in the top income tax bracket, permitting a tax increase on high-income earners would be a significant disincentive for savings…  This decision [to raise taxes on interest, dividends, and capital gains] will affect not only the near-term outlook for the economy but savings and investment decisions for the long-run as well. Consumer spending has its place, but it is not the answer to every economic question. By disparaging investment and in particular the taxpayers who account for most of that investment, Congress is biting the hand that feeds long-run economic growth.

Ziad K. Abdelnour, President & CEO of Blackhawk Partners, blogs that the nation’s successful entrepreneurs deserve gratitude instead of increased taxes:

The entrepreneurial knowledge that is the crux of wealth creation has little to do with glamorous work, or with the certified expertise of advanced degrees. Great wealth usually comes from doing what other people consider insufferably boring.

The treacherous intricacies of building codes or garbage routes or software languages or groceries, the mechanics of butchering sheep and pigs or frying and freezing potatoes, the murky lore of petroleum leases or housing deeds, the ways and means of pushing pizzas or insurance policies or hawking hosiery or pet supplies or scrounging for pennies in fast-food unit sales, all of those tasks are deemed tedious and trivial.

In short, our rich – America’s best entrepreneurs – perform work that most others spurn.

Whether it was Henry Ford or Apple’s co- founder Steve Wozniak, much of America’s greatest wealth creators began in the “skunk works” of their trades, with their hands on the intricate machinery that would determine the fate of their companies. Bill Gates began by mastering the tedious intricacies of programming languages. Familiarity with the very material, the grit and grease, the petty tedium of their businesses liberates entrepreneurs from the grip of established expertise and gives them the insight and confidence to turn their industries in new directions. All had to stoop to conquer the American economy.

Because these men and women often overthrow rather than undergird establishments, the richest among us usually begin as rebels and outsiders. Often they live in places like Bentonville, Ark.; Omaha; or Mission Hills, Kans.; mentioned in New York chiefly as the butt of a comedy routine.

The truth is, great wealth is often created by the launching of great surprises, not just the launching of great enterprises. Unpredictability is a fundamental part of great wealth creation, and as such, defies every econometric model or centralized planner’s vision. It makes no sense to most professors, who attain their positions by the systematic acquisition of credentials pleasing to the establishment above them. By definition, innovations cannot be planned…

The belief that wealth consists not in ideas, attitudes, moral codes, and mental disciplines but in definable and static things that can be seized and redistributed is the materialist superstition

It baffles nearly all conglomerateurs, who believe they can safely enter new industries by buying rather than by learning them. Capitalist means of production are not land, labor, or capital but minds and hearts.

The wealth of America isn’t an inventory of goods; it’s an organic, living entity, a fragile, pulsing fabric of ideas, expectations, loyalties, moral commitments, visions, and people. To vivisect it for redistribution would eventually kill it. As Mitterrand’s French technocrats found early in the 1980s, the proud new socialist owners of complex systems of wealth soon learn they are administering an industrial corpse rather than a growing corporation.

That is why the single most important economic issue of our time – and one that impacts the poor and middle class alike – will be how we treat the very rich among us.

If the majority of Americans smear, harass, overtax, and over regulate this minority of wealth creators, our politicians will be shocked and horrified to discover how swiftly the physical tokens of the means of production collapse into so much corroded wire, eroding concrete, and scrap metal.  They will be amazed at how quickly the wealth of America is either destroyed, or flees to other countries.

© 2017 Ballast Point Ventures. All rights reserved.